Food & Drink

Burrata, Prosciutto & Arugula Flatbread

DSC_5457

DSC_5473

DSC_5461

My first copycat recipe!  A few months ago, while I was perusing Trader Joe’s (aka my “fun” store), I saw this Burrata, Prosciutto & Arugula Flatbread in the frozen section by all the pizzas.  Naturally, I was interested.  Burrata, good.  Prosciutto, good.  Arugula, good!  I grabbed one and popped it in the oven that evening.  It’s probably the best frozen pizza I’ve ever had.

Okay, so I’m 98.7% sure that the only reason Trader Joe’s doesn’t call this a pizza is because there’s really no sauce on it.  Since burrata is naturally really creamy, it serves as a sauce base.

Burrata, Prosciutto & Arugula Flatbread

  • Servings: 2-4
  • Print

Ingredients

Dough

  • 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 1/2 cup bread flour (+ more for work surface)
  • 2 Tb olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Topping

  • 1 cup fresh arugula (one fist full)
  • 8 oz burrata (about 2 medium burrata)
  • 6 slices prosciutto
  • 1 Tb olive oil

Method

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine yeast, sugar and warm water.  Wait about 5-7 minutes, until the yeast is foamy.  Add bread flour, olive oil, and salt.  Mix until well combined and transfer to a work surface and knead until smooth ball forms.  Let it rest for 15 minutes.
  2. Preheat oven to 450°F.  Roll out dough to a 9×13 rectangle and transfer to a baking sheet.  Brush the top of the dough with olive oil.  Break open the burrata. Smear the creamy filling all over the rolled out dough and evenly distribute the mozzarella “shell”.  Top with arugula.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 15-20 minutes, or until crust is golden brown.  Wrinkle each prosciutto slice into a nest and place on top of the flatbread.

Recipe notes:

  • For crispy prosciutto, simply add the prosciutto prior to baking.

Food & Drink

Chocolate Pots de Crème

DSC_5397

DSC_5400

In college, one of my go-to quick desserts were mini pudding cups.  I’d cut up a rolled-out pie crust and place them in a muffin tin and blind bake them.  Meanwhile, I’d make chocolate pudding (from the box) and stuff the cups.  It was super easy and looked quite impressive.

I have nothing against chocolate pudding now, but I do think there are so many other fun desserts that have that pudding-like consistency and taste so much more elevated.  One of them is pots de crème.  Pots de crème literally translates to “pots of cream” in French.  It is a loose-textured custard, quite similar to pudding.  It tastes so rich and decadent but it takes so little effort.  Like seriously you’ll be done in less than 10 minutes (well you do have to wait for everything to cool, that’s the hard part).

DSC_5387DSC_5383DSC_5391

Chocolate Pots de Crème

  • Servings: 4
  • Print

Ingredients

Pots de Crème

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 cup bittersweet chocolate chips

Topping

  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 Tb granulated sugar

Method

  1. In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, whisk together egg yolks, milk, heavy cream, granulated sugar, and a pinch of salt over medium-low heat.  Continually whisking until mixture is thick and can coat the back of a spoon, about 8-10 minutes.
  2. Pour in chocolate chips and whisk until chocolate is melted and everything is incorporated.  Transfer this mixture into 4 ramekins (mine were 5oz ramekins).  Place in the refrigerator to set, about 1-2 hours.
  3. Before serving, whisk together heavy cream and granulated sugar until soft peaks.  Top the chilled pots de crème.

 

Food & Drink

Matcha Milkshake

DSC_5244

DSC_5239

Today we got the first glimpses of summer, aka the high 70s and humid.  We do a lot of home improvement stuff on weekends, so we’re always working up a sweat.  I craved something sweet but didn’t want to bake anything and further heat up our house … milkshake it is!

I love, love, love homemade milkshakes because I am uber picky about the consistency.  Making it at home guarantees that I’ll drink something that I really enjoy.  Today, I whipped up some matcha milkshakes for Ian and myself after a long day of doing electrical work.

Matcha Milkshake

  • Servings: 2
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 Tb matcha powder
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cup vanilla ice cream
  • 1 tsp honey

Method

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender.  Blend until smooth.  Serve immediately.

Recipe notes:

  • How much milk and ice cream you use will really depend on how hard your ice cream is and what the consistency you’d like the finished product to be.  My ice cream was hard with little air bubbles, so my milkshake consistency was a thick, smoothie-like texture.  If you like it thinner or thicker, just add either milk or ice cream until you reach desired consistency.

Food & Drink

Waffle Cookies

DSC_5137

DSC_5121

A while back, I was perusing the aisles of Whole Foods when I discovered their cookie section in the bakery.  It was basically a display case of a few dozen options for cookies.  I immediately gravitated towards these waffle cookies.  They were these bite-sized cookies and just so darn cute.  However, at $11.99/lb, I was quickly brought back to reality and I walked away, super sad that I was cookie-less.

I haven’t stopped thinking about those waffles and wondered how I can achieve those at home.  I have a waffle maker.  I know how to make cookies.  I donned on my apron and go to experimenting.  These cookies needed a little bit more butter because they need all the help they can get in crisping up since the cooking time on these is super quick.

Waffle Cookies

  • Servings: 2-3 dozen cookies
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup salted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder

Method

  1. In a large mixing bowl, beat together butter and both sugars until creamy.  Add eggs, vanilla extract, flour, and baking powder.  Beat until well-mixed.
  2. Preheat waffle iron on the highest setting.  Spray the waffle iron with cooking spray.  Drop a tablespoon of cookie batter on each well/section of the waffle maker (I have 4 sections to my waffle maker, so each time I make 4 cookies).
  3. When the waffle maker indicates the “waffle” is finished, lift and check for browning.  If it’s too light, continue cooking, checking every 10 seconds.  Remove the waffles when done and transfer to a cooling rack (it’ll be soft when you first take it out of the waffle maker and it’ll crisp up as it cools).  Repeat until you finish cooking all the cookies.

Food & Drink

Miso Salmon

DSC_4941

I love miso so darn much.  If anything is miso-flavored, count me in.  Although salmon is already so flavorful as-is, add in miso, it climbs to one of my favorite dishes.

My mom made miso salmon a lot when I was growing up.  She would use a miso paste and dilute it with hot water and just brush it on the salmon before baking.  It was pretty good (because again, it’s salmon & miso), but I wanted to see if I could create something that packs more flavor.

I don’t consider myself an experienced seafood cook, especially when it comes to using the oven.  My biggest fear is obviously overbaking it and having a dry slab of fish.  But I have discovered that the best way to prevent dry salmon is actually broiling it.  Trust me, it’ll make the crispiest crust but inside will be the juiciest salmon you’ll ever eat.

DSC_4944-2

Miso Salmon

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 16-18oz salmon fillet, skin-on (I purchased 3 pre-portioned at the butcher counter, each weighing around 6oz)
  • 2 Tb miso paste
  • 1 Tb mirin
  • 1 Tb rice vinegar
  • 1 Tb soy sauce
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • Optional: vegetables, sesame seeds, scallions

Method

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together miso paste, mirin, rice vinegar, soy sauce, and sugar.  Place salmon in the bowl and gently rub in the miso sauce.  Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for 1-2 hours.
  2. Turn your oven on to Broil and let it preheat for 5-10 minutes.  On a lightly greased baking pan, place salmon skin side down.  Brush the tops with residual miso sauce.  If you’d like to roast vegetables with the salmon, put it on the pan as well!
  3. Broil for 10-12 minutes.  Check for doneness by gently flaking the tallest part of the salmon, if it flakes easily, it is done.  Top with sesame seeds and scallions, if desired.

Recipe notes:

  • Because miso is very salty, opt for reduced-sodium soy sauce, if possible.
  • If you are broiling vegetables along with the salmon, opt for vegetables that require a longer cooking time, such as asparagus or carrots.  Quick-cooking vegetables will be done before the salmon is done.
  • The broil time depends on the thickness of the salmon.  My filets are typically 1 1/2 inch at the thickest part, so I usually aim for 12 minutes to cook through.  If you have thinner filets, check earlier for doneness.

Food & Drink

Crispy Waffles

DSC_4935.jpg

Has this ever happened to you?  You get up in the morning and you are pumped to make a batch of waffles.  But by the time you’ve finished making them, they’re all soggy and soft.  BOO!  I recently had a Bob Ross moment where I discovered a “happy accident” when I was making waffles but ran out of milk.  I had some heavy cream on hand to use and omg, it was the crispiest waffles I’ve ever had.  Who would’ve thunk more fat can make waffles crispy? (lol)

Crispy Waffles

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tb granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tb & 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp almond extract
  • Optional: 3/4 cup of add-ins (chocolate chips, blueberries, etc.)

Method

  1. Preheat waffle iron.  In a large bowl, beat eggs until light and fluffy.  Beat in the remaining ingredients (except for add-ins) for 2 minutes.  Fold in add-ins, if desired.
  2. In preheated waffle iron, pour mix in and cook until ready.  (In a standard waffle iron, it is about 1/3 cup mix per waffle).
  3. Place finished waffles on a cooling rack to release steam or on a baking sheet and place in an oven set at 200°F.

Food & Drink

Taiwanese Breakfast Crêpes

DSC_4922

Who else likes breakfast for dinner?  Growing up in Taiwan, a lot of times, we would go out for breakfast on weekends and busy mornings.  Taiwanese breakfast joints are not like the swanky brunch places where you’d have a glass of mimosa.  On the contrary, they are often hole-in-the-wall places where you run in, devour your food in less than 5 minutes, and hop on your moped and be on your way.

I absolutely love all Taiwanese breakfast choices, but the one that I love the most is called dan bing 蛋餅, which roughly translates to egg-pastry.  The closest thing that resembles a dan bing is probably the crêpe, although dan bing has a little bit more chewiness in the batter.  The process for making dan bing is also very similar to a crêpe as well.  The batter is very liquidy, and you pour it on a skillet and then top with the toppings.  In this case, the toppings is an egg mixture that resembles an omelette.  This comes together so quickly that I find myself making this as emergency meals.

DSC_4925

Taiwanese Breakfast Crêpes

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 6 large eggs
  • 3 stalks scallions, thinly chopped
  • Oil for cooking

Method

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornstarch, water, and 1/2 tsp salt.  Set aside.
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, scallions, and remaining 1/2 tsp salt.
  3. In a nonstick skillet, heat a tsp of oil over medium heat.  Pour about 1/2 cup of crêpe batter and swirl on the skillet until it coats the bottom of the skillet in a thin layer.  When the tops look set, gently flip the crêpe over.  Pour 1/4 cup of egg mixture on top of the crêpe and swirl the pan to coat the egg mixture all over the base.  When the egg mixture has adhered, flip the whole thing over and cook for approximately 30 seconds, or until the egg is cooked through.
  4. Roll up the crêpe and repeat with remaining batter.  Drizzle with soy paste and top with scallions to garnish, if desired.

Recipe notes:

  • Soy paste is a type of soy sauce that is thicker, less salty, and quite sweet.  You should be able to find it in your Asian grocery aisle.  If you don’t have it, soy sauce is a fine substitute, just use it sparingly.